2 Dental Implant Complications You Should Know – Video by Burbank’s Dr. Amin

A patient in my Burbank office asked me about the long-term with implants. Dental implant complications can occur.  Most focus on the surgery, but what I am talking about is what happens later down the road. Later, meaning after the crown, bridge or full implant restoration has been attached to the implants.

This video reviews two problems that can occur with a dental implant months or years down the road.

Keep in mind that "regular dentistry" has complications too.  Fillings break, crowns wear out, root canals become lose their seal, etc…unfortunately nothing is forever.  But with good upkeep and regular visits, potential problems can be taken care of more easily than waiting. The skill and training of your dentist plays a huge role.  Dont choose your dentist by price alone.

 

Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
Fellow of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry
Burbank, California
http://www.burbankdentalimplants.com

Are you a new patient?

captcha

This entry was posted in Dental Bone Loss, Dental Implants, Videos and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

36 Responses to 2 Dental Implant Complications You Should Know – Video by Burbank’s Dr. Amin

  1. Garry Thomson says:

    Thanks for this video explanation. You are really an expert!

  2. Duane Satterfield says:

    Hello,
    I had a root canal & crown about 2 yrs ago. The crown came loose & was hurting horrible. I saw Endo Dr yesterday & my tooth was cracked. He removed the crown but I woke up last night with horrible pain near the tooth & in my jaw & ear. Should I have the tooth removed right away? I have been taking Clindamycin for 3 days. I don’t understand why it still hurts when I have no root? Thanks for your help. I need to see you for an implant.
    Thanks,
    Duane

  3. Hi Duane,
    If the tooth is cracked, extracting it asap is generally best. Keep in mind that the implant may be able to be placed at the same time of the extraction. With that in mind, it would be good to see you before the extraction.
    If an immediate implant can be done predictably, it will save you time and money.
    What tooth is it?
    Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
    Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
    Fellow of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry
    Burbank, California
    http://www.burbankdentalimplants.com

    • sally vaughan says:

      i am scheduled for a extraction and at the same time to receive preparation for a back tooth implant because a crown didn,t stop the pain or infection from a decayed problem can I handle the pain more pain from the 3 roots expelled on the same day when a plastic preparation will also be put in on the same day?

      • HI Sally,

        I am not quite sure I understand your question. Can you please clarify?

        Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
        Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
        Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

  4. Louise Ramsey says:

    Thank you for your frankness and ability to explain implants so well. I was apprehensive about an implant but I feel it would be best for me now that I have listened to your videos.

  5. You are welcome Louise!
    Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
    Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
    Fellow of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry
    Burbank, California
    http://www.burbankdentalimplants.com

  6. Naaz Maherali says:

    Hi Dr. Ramsey,
    I was looking at your website and was wondering if you could give me a second opinion on decision I have to make very shortly and its weighing on my mind. My dentist is going to put an implant in my lower back molar and he says I have 2mm space from the nerve after the implant is put in. Is that enough space? I am 58 years old and otherwise in good health except for my WBC which is 3.5 (low). My surgery is on Aug 19th. My dentist is probably 60 years old and has been doing this for 5 years. I would really appreciate if you could give me some advice.
    I hope I have posted this in the right spot, not very good at using the computer.
    Thank you kindly
    Naaz

  7. Hi Naaz,
    Being within 2mm of the nerve is considered safe. The training, skill, experience and judgement of your dentist during the procedure is most crucial for a great outcome.
    I’m sure you will do fine. :)
    Some implants are placed to within 0.5mm of the nerve under tacticle sensation by very experienced implant dentists.
    Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
    Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
    Fellow of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry
    Burbank, California
    http://www.burbankdentalimplants.com

  8. Juliet says:

    Several weeks ago I had a old lower back bridge removed. It was then suggested to get implants. So I have the back tooth (which needs to be re-capped, then space, space, then the other tooth that has to be recapped. It was a very old bridge maybe 30 years. The dentist filled some cavities in those teeth and didn’t do a root canal, thought all would be ok. Then I had the two implants put in, bone was good, but had gum graft. Dentist said not to brush just antibiotics, and antibiotic rinse. It was also found that I had a root tip still in that area that they put the implants, but the dentist thought she could remove it and then put the implants in. However, she could not and decided to put the implants anyway and said she was pleased after looking at the xrays. However now after two weeks, somewhere it feels like nerve pain and I don’t know if it is the two teeth on either side of the implant that are acting up, or the implants. I have to go back soon for further instructions on maintenance and follow up. I am petrified of any complications – the dentist will be going away for several weeks now due to the holidays. Wonder where I go from here…

  9. sinus lift says:

    very informative video, thank you Dr. Amin

  10. Jeanette B says:

    Tooth #6 has some external resorption (and lots of pain). This is not the first tooth I will have to have removed due to this issue. I can either do a root canal and orthodontic extrusion, or an implant. If the pain goes so far up into my head that I can’t open my eye in the morning easily (and sinus headache), does that mean I might have nerve sensitivity after implant?

    • If the tooth is removed the nerve pain will be gone and will have no relation on the future dental implant. Find out if the resorption is near the apex or the top of the tooth. This makes all the difference.

      Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S., D.A.B.O.I.
      Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
      Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

      • Jeanette B says:

        Thank you so much. I really appreciate your expert guidance. If wish your office was on the east coast!
        The decision has been made to do an implant (immediate load), but
        I do have one more decision to make. A very talented and respected periodontist who I have a great relationship with offered to do the implant. While she is extremely experienced in delayed implants, I don’t believe she does immediate often and stated it would be a 2.5 hour procedure. My dentist prefers another specialist who does them often (1 hour procedure). Why do you think the discrepancy in time? Am I being foolish in going to the person I know vs someone who can “do them with their eyes closed”? I am scared out of my wits, but I have already made a commitment to her. I am worried about the time in the chair and the recovery time as well as the success of the surgery. I do know that she uses a template, where he does not. Might that account for additional time?

        • Hi Jeanette,

          That is a tough decision. Remember that it is not a race! Time is not a big factor. I suggest you just ask why it takes her longer.
          I would probably stick with the person you have a good relationship with.

          Respectfully,

          Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
          Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
          Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

  11. jenny says:

    Had immediate implant (temporized) march 28 and I still have episodic pain at least every other day constant (4 weeks now). Is that normal? Seems like the top of the implant bores into my head, sometimes pinching and the gum is normal but sensitive to pressure. I am losing my mind and everyone is pointing to other reasons: tmj, sinus issues, etc. I go to one doctor and they say it’s the other doctors issue. Who can help me?

    • Any improvement in the last few days?

      Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
      Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
      Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry
      Burbank, CA

      • jenny says:

        Back and forth to dentist, perio, endodontist (for neighboring teeth) and physician with all saying slow healing. Meantime, the following week on vacation,the cheek starts hurting and I am told it is infected by ship’s doctor. He gives me a week of augmentin and tells me to follow up with regular doctor (who previously said I am fine). I am at my wits end… I had an abscess last year that eluded multiple x rays and mri. Found that on vacation at ER with CT scan. At this point I’ve had pain for over half of the last year every day due to dental problems. I am really scared that just like last year, an infection that doesn’t show on xrays may be spreading to other teeth. No one believes I have a problem… who can I go to?

        • jenny says:

          It’s been 11 weeks and I still have issues. No inflammation, but pain and bleeding with flossing (is the floss supposed to go way up under the gumline?). Cone beam scan was normal, but I can see there is still a lot of space for the bone to fill in (dark areas). On a CT scan for sinus, I saw a black tiny bubble in between the implant and the next tooth, but the radiologist made no mention of it. There was also a black space at the top of implant, but again, I was told it’s normal. Is there a way to post xrays here?

          • Sorry Jenny…there is no way to post x-rays. Floss is supposed to go under the gumline.

            Reading x-rays is not something that can be described here. Only a dentist or radiologist can read them.

            Respectfully,

            Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
            Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
            Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

  12. Eileen says:

    My surgeon had to leave a root tip after my extraction. Can I still have an implant?
    He left in the root because of too much bleeding.

  13. Noelle says:

    Hello Dr. Ramsey,

    I am getting implants done probably this year. I am 31 yrs old and have a family history of not having some adult teeth that ever grew in. Unfortunately I was passed down with this heritary dental problem, and have only had a few that are now failing and all the rest are baby teeth still. I have 3 teeth on top that have been bridged my whole life and have lasted until now after the birth of my first son.

    I had one tooth removed due to an abcess that possibly ate up into my sinuses through bone. Now I am looking into geting 4 implants placed with a full top denture attached on top. My dentist here wants to pull the remaining teeth and roots left since there’s not many, and place 4 implants in at angles, in order not to have to do a sinus lift. (If he went straight up he would have to do surgery to raise my sinuses in order for the posts to not go in them.)

    This is the second opinion I’ve had. The first implant dr said he would have to do sinus lift, then bone grafting and then implants. Which would cost a fortune. This dr. said he could save me money by doing the screws at an angle so that they can reach some bone high up and not have to touch the sinuses.

    I’m of course leaning to the dr. who is opting towards not doing the sinus lift or bone grafting due to more simplicity and cost reasons. Otherwise it’s going to cost a fortune, plus I have to eventually get my whole bottom part of my mouth done in the future too, so that will also be very expensive.

    My question to you is, do you think the implants on top will last the rest of my life (since I’m so young) and succeed if he puts them at an angle and does not do any bone grafting. I’m concerned that the angle will cause extra stress on the teeth or bite and that by not adding the bone, it will not be secure enough. As I age I’m afraid of bone loss. He says he thinks there’s enough bone up high that if he uses his longest screws it will reach the bone and be secure enough. I’m not sure about this. Any thoughts???

    • Hi Noelle,

      If you are only 31 I would build your teeth to try to last the rest of your life. I would design things so that down the road, when you need to repair an implant or the bridge it will be simple to maintain. You will have some problems just because you will have these teeth for 50 years or so!

      If you have all of your teeth only supported by angled implants, if one has a problem you are going to need to replace the enitre bridge.

      Make sure the teeth you are getting are not acrylic plastic either. It is better to spend the money to do the best considering your age and future with the teeth. Place more than less implants. You wont be sorry.

      Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
      Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
      Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry
      Burbank, CA

  14. Melhem says:

    Thanks for the informative video. I read recently that implants do not go well for smokers, and quitting is imperative for certain period of time prior to implant planning. How accurate is this and what happens for a smoker with new implants?
    Thanks!

    • RamseyAminDDS says:

      Hi Melhem,

      Smoking impairs bone healing but it does not mean you cant have dental implants. Smoking is more likely to cause bone graft failure in addition to poor healing of the implants. Smoking in any form or amount is not good. Smoking five or less per day is best.
      I routinely place implants on smokers, but I have a special protocol for patients to follow.

      Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
      Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
      Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry
      Burbank, CA

  15. Laura says:

    I had the remaining top teeth pulled, (lost most in a car accident in ’91), the rest were in bad shape. That was 4 months ago. Since then the dentist has had 3 dentures made and none of them (including the one I’m wearing) fit my mouth. He tries to modify them, (all 3, he has all the equipment), but they still don’t work. I can wear them to go in public, but can’t eat anything with them. After 4 months he now tells me that I should have implants and he’ll do them and modify the denture to fit the implants. I have already paid him, up front, for the bad dentures, work on my bottom teeth (8 crowns, not done yet) and for the 4 implants. BUT…Now I have lost all trust in him and am scared to have any of the work done. He makes me fell bad, like I am just a complainer. All I wanted was nice looking teeth I can eat with. $13,000 has my husband angry and me depressed.

    • RamseyAminDDS says:

      Hi Laura,

      I feel for your situation. I think there may have been unmet expectations and clear objectives on both your part and your dentist.

      I suggest you both sit down and review the goals of treatment. Also review what was done and what remains. You may want to modify the plan. Take some molds of your teeth during the reassessment. This is what I would do.

      I hope this helps!

      Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
      Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
      Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

  16. Alyssa says:

    I have an implant (#7) that I seem to be having some trouble with. The gum tissue around the implant area is very inflamed and the crown feels loose, but it is not loose. The first time I received the implant it rejected within 2 weeks, and the second implant has been in for over 2 years. The dentist gave me a special mouthwash to help with the infection, but it doesn’t seem to be helping (I’ve only been using it for about a week and half, so I don’t know if I should give it some more time). The gum tissue doesn’t seem to hurt, but it’s more or less annoying and, like I stated earlier, makes it seem like my crown is loose. It would be much appreciated if you could help me figure out what may be going on with my implant!

    • RamseyAminDDS says:

      Hi Alyssa,

      I assume you have an x-ray of the area. If a patient tells me something is loose, it usually is. You know your body best but sometimes it is really hard to tell.

      Have the implant, the crown and the abutment checked carefully for looseness ASAP. Inflammation is not normal.

      Respectfully,

      Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
      Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
      Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry
      Burbank, CA

  17. Shell says:

    I had one implant put in my mouth many years ago. I was 18 at the time. I had a tooth that had calcified in the gum so my oral surgeon removed it and later replaced it with this implant. He put some kind of substance around the lower front part of gum to build a foundation for the implant. I want to say it was coral but it was so long ago. I can’t find anything online stating that coral was used by oral surgeons for this procedure but this is what I remember. He told me that it would leak out a few white specks for a few days and then stop and that this was completely normal. It did just that and stopped leaking after a few days. Everything has been going well over the years with this implant but recently I noticed at the bottom of the gum line directly in front of the implant there is a slight cave-in. I also see little white specks that resemble the coral he packed in there and can feel them with my finger. I am really concerned. Does this mean the bone is regressing? I am meticulous about my oral hygiene and have never had a cavity. I am not sure who I should go see: an oral surgeon or a dentist. Thank you for your helpful site!

    • Ramsey Amin DDS says:

      Hi Shell,

      I would see any dentist with a strong background in dental implants. Some bone graft materials that are coral based never ever turn into bone.

      That being said, a piece that did not integrate could surface years later. It is not likely a problem. As long is the probing depth is good and no threads are felt, you will likely be fine for a long time!

      Good luck,

      Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
      Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
      Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

  18. Shell says:

    Thank you so much! You have eased my stress. Going to find an implant dentist in my area :). I would go to your office but I live states away. Thanks again and Happy New Year!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>