Category Archives: Ramsey Amin DDS

Shaping And Forming Gum Around Front Teeth Dental Implants – Ramsey Amin DDS Reviews

Of the 100’s of articles I have written, this is one topic that is often not well understood by dentists or patients. So what is shaping, grooming, forming and training of gums around dental implants?

It is the process of getting the gum line around your front tooth dental implant to look as natural as possible. What makes the gum look natural? I will focus on some of the really important items:

1. The evenness of one gum line to the adjacent teeth gum line
2. The triangle of gum tissue “papilla” to be filled in. This is located between your gum.
3. The volume of gum on the outside of the implant.
4. The 3-dimensional placement of the surgical portion of the implant.
5. The health of the adjacent teeth
6. Genetically thick or thin gum and tissue


flat gum tissue without papilla or gum line before dental implant placement

flat gum tissue without papilla or gum line before dental implant placement

preoperative photograph-flat gum tissue

preoperative photograph-flat gum tissue

preoperative picture showing flat gum tissue

preoperative picture showing flat gum tissue


surgical placement of implant just slightly below bone level

surgical placement of implant just slightly below bone level

screw retained dental implant temporary interproximal view

screw retained dental implant temporary interproximal view

screw retained dental implant temporary facial view

screw retained dental implant temporary facial view


screw retained dental implant temporary, lingual view

screw retained dental implant temporary, lingual view

Implant with uneven gum line and missing papilla triangles of gum.

Implant with uneven gum line and missing papilla triangles of gum.

implant temporary and gum graft on same day as dental implant placement. Sutures visible

implant temporary and gum graft on same day as dental implant placement. Sutures visible


2 weeks after dental implant temporary. Notice that gum tissue is still open but beginning to form.

2 weeks after dental implant temporary. Notice that gum tissue is still open but beginning to form.

3 days after dental implant temporary

3 days after dental implant temporary

2 months with dental implant temporary

2 months with dental implant temporary


3 months with dental implant temporary

3 months with dental implant temporary

4 months temporary

4 months temporary

temporary after 4 months and multiple material addition to make gumline look near-perfect

temporary after 4 months and multiple material addition to make gumline look near-perfect


impression coping showing scalloped gum architecture

impression coping showing scalloped gum architecture

material added to existing temporary to modify gum level

material added to existing temporary to modify gum level

final implant after 18 months. Photograph during patient's cleaning visit.

final implant after 18 months. Photograph during patient’s cleaning visit.


custom zirconia abutment

custom zirconia abutment

final implant on day of insertion


On this particular patient I was replacing her upper right lateral incisor. I took many pictures over the course of a few months to monitor the gum healing. Read the captions to follow along the progress.  You will see how the gum changes over several months!

When you have a front tooth dental implant it is very important that you get a temporary made on the implant so that the gums can be made to follow the new shape of the tooth. If you have been missing a tooth for a long time, then the gum tissue is flat. It takes time to develop this gullwing shaped arching effect from one tooth gum line to the next. Sometimes surgical correction is needed but most of the time shaping the temporary properly and giving it 2-6 months will allow it to happen on its own.

Your implant has to be put into a good position for this to work. If the angle of the implant is too far forward and the head of the implant is too close to your lips, the implant will end up being long looking. Sometimes there are no other options because your jaw may angle outwards in the bone is so thin that there is no leeway and placing the implant closer to your tongue. But, ideally the implant should be placed just behind the edges of the upper front teeth. So, the first step in having a great gum line is having a very well placed implant in the bone in the first place!!!. Sometimes computer guided surgery helps but not always because there are errors.

There must also be a lot of bone on the outer wall of the implant. 1-2 mm or more of extra bone on the outside of the implant with good, thick gum tissue on top will allow for proper volume of gum so the tooth looks like it is coming out the gum rather than laying on top of the gum. This is not always possible and sometimes a gum graft needs to be done in combination with a bone graft in order to achieve the final volume. The implant must not be too large. Smaller, longer implants are often best in the front teeth areas.

In my practice, your dental implant gum line begins taking shape from the time the tooth is extracted. Your tooth must be very carefully extracted as to preserve as much of the gum is possible from being lost during the extraction process. Sometimes an extraction and immediate non-load dental implant is needed and sometimes staging the implant over time and doing a socket bone preservation graft is better.
If the implant is stable enough to have a same day temporary crown put directly on the implant it needs to be shaped a certain way. The implant temporary that I make for your implant usually has a “negative facial contours.” This allows the gum line not to be pushed away but rather create a thicker “cuff” of tissue around the base of the implant. If the temporaries placed on the same day that the implant is placed then thick gum training and shaping begins on that day. If the implant has to be buried or a large bone graft was done, this process will begin later on.

You can see in some of the photographs how the temporary crown is created by hand and attached by a screw to the replica green implant. This allows me to do all of the forming and shaping outside of your mouth. The sides or interproximal areas of your teeth are shaped in such a way to promote the triangle of gum tissue to grow to the proper flossing contact height. In some cases the temporary needs to be removed a few times and material either added or subtracted from it in just the right spot to move the gum line to the desired position. Most of the front teeth dental implant temporaries I make are held in with a screw rather than cement to make this easier for you.

Growing the triangle gum papilla to the proper height is often dictated by your adjacent teeth. If the tooth on either side has bone loss, even minor, the gum is much less likely to fill in completely leaving a small black triangle. This can be preplanned in advance in many situations. Oftentimes the crown can be made with a little bit of extra porcelain to fill in the black hole or sometimes the tooth right next door would need a tiny filling to close the space up. As long as it does not make your smile look asymmetric, often times this can work well. Ideally all the gum grows back to original height. It is also important that your dental implant be placed at the right depth. There is kind of a “sweet spot” or the implant is not too deep and not too shallow…..it is very much an art and can be very “touchy” and delicate.

Oftentimes front teeth require custom abutments to be made to follow the highs and lows of the scalloping gum tissue. The custom abutment also helps and supporting what is called the “emergence profile” of the tooth. This is the transition from where the implant is in the bone to where the gum line begins. In 2016, your tissue training, molding/grooming can be re-created into a 3-D printed model using an intraoral scanner like the trios 3. This prevents the gum from collapsing during the ‘molding’ digital or conventional impression.

I understand there are a lot of fine details, but it takes a lot to make a front tooth look great! It is all about the gums and not so much about the white porcelain part of the tooth. This is what separates good from great dental implants that are done right the first time. This process of shaping the gum line can take from just a few days to more than a year to complete. Each case is very unique.

Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.

Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

Diabetes, Dental Implants and Bone Grafts…Is it Safe?

You may be reading this because you are at a diabetic in need of an extraction and bone graft or full mouth dental implants.  You are probably well aware that diabetes can cause slow healing from dental surgery or any type of surgery.  You can be at a higher risk of complications because of being a diabetic.

So how do I do dental implants and bone grafts on diabetics?  VERY Carefully!!!

bone-graft-squareDiabetes affects all organ systems.  Big fluctuations in blood sugar cause your healing to be impaired.  Diabetics are prone to problems with feet, eyes and kidneys but oftentimes develop periodontal disease/gum disease which has likely led you to this point to read about implants and extractions.  I tell all my diabetic patients that you must be extremely diligent in the care of your teeth even more so than someone that does not have diabetes.  This is because you are more prone to lose them and replacing teeth with implants is more difficult than your situation… difficult but not impossible.

In these photographs I show two patients that have had similar treatment at the same 7-10 day follow-up.   I treated both patients. You can see that the patient that  has diabetes that is not well managed is healing much slower than the patient that does not have diabetes.  This is not always the case but this is a great example! 

Diabetic that is not well managed is healing much slower

Diabetic that is not well managed is healing much slower

Non-diabetic with normal healing

Non-diabetic with normal healing

Neither one of these patients had bone grafting in addition to the implants they only had four implants placed in the same area for a lower dental implant overdenture.  They are both females in their 60’s.

You are probably familiar with taking your blood sugar. These numbers need to be as low as possible in the good range.  Blood sugar testing should be routine and a very important number called the “hemoglobin A1c” gives me an idea of how well you will heal after a dental implant/bone graft procedure.

Ideally the lower the A1c number the better because that gives me an idea over the last 3 months how stable your blood sugar control is.  If the A1c and daily blood sugar readings are high, then perhaps we need to consult with your endocrinologist to get it into better health.  Of course your diet and lifestyle have a lot to do with diabetes control.  Sometimes just switching meds does the trick while others need to be managed with an insulin pump.

In the weeks prior and at least 4-6 weeks after a dental surgical procedure, try to be as strict is possible with your diet and diabetes control.  It is in this critical early-phase that major complications can happen and failures or infections are most likely to happen.

diabetes-squareI use some special techniques to try to help my diabetic patients heal as quickly as possible.  For the last 14 years or so, I have used the patient’s own blood to make special concentrated versions that carry growth factors, which aid in the healing process.  Also a strict aseptic/sterile technique of placing implants, bone grafts helps reduce your chance of infection by having a very clean environment to start with.  Antibiotics are almost always necessary often in the IV and given by mouth for 7-10 days afterwards and occasionally longer.

Keep in mind that some implants and bone grafts are **far more** complicated than others.  The more complex the situation, the higher the risk of having some sort of complications.   For example, full mouth dental implants and block bone grafting is more complex than a single socket graft.

I would suggest that you work with a very skilled and experienced provider who has done hundreds of implants successfully on diabetics to figure out what is right for you.  Be very open and honest with your implant dentist so you can safely treated and have it done right the first time.  You can be succesfully treated!  Type 2 diabetes is better than Type 1 but both can be treated. You must be managed a bit differently to prevent implant failure and bone loss.

Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
Fellow-American Academy of Implant Dentistry

Broken Tooth Replaced With Immediate Dental Implant -X-ray Series

Here is a really interesting case on a patient of mine from Burbank, California.

His tooth root canal cracked and was not savable.  It is not often you see a tooth that just splits in half like this image below!  A single dental implant was placed on the same day I extracted the broken tooth fragments. This is called an immediate dental implant.

Here is the sequence of events on x-ray: