Zinc Poisoning from Denture Adhesive? Burbank Dental Implant Dentist Review

This is very new information that is yet another reason to have dental implants rather than using messy pastes and liners to hold in loose dentures.

Zinc is a component used to make denture adhesive.  When you use excessive denture adhesive paste, you ingest zinc.

Excessive zinc intake may cause problems in the blood and nerves of your body.

There is no need for denture adhesive if you have an implant overdenture or have fixed dental implant bridges.

Below is the actual letter sent out to all dentists. If you wear loose dentures and use these products, I suggest you read this carefully. I have highlighted the important parts.

Please ask any questions in the comments section below.

Ramsey A. Amin, D.D.S.
Diplomate of the American Board of Oral Implantology /Implant Dentistry
Burbank, California
http://www.burbankdentalimplants.com

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GlaxoSmithKline

February 18, 2010

Dear Doctor,

This communication is to alert you of the potential health risk from long-term excessive use of GSK's zinc-containing denture adhesives Super Poligrip 'Original', Super Poligrip 'Ultra Fresh', and Super Poligrip 'Extra Care.' As patient safety is our foremost concern, as a precautionary measure GSK has voluntarily stopped the manufacture, distribution and advertising of these products. GSK has discussed this situation with the FDA and no further action is required.

GSK continuously monitors published scientific literature and the adverse events we receive in relation to all our products. There is a variety of sources of zinc and it is an essential part of a healthy diet. However, in 2009 we received an increased number of adverse event reports. Together with the published literature", these suggest that excessive use of these products, typically for several years, may lead to the development of excessive levels of zinc in the blood (associated with copper deficiency). The reports describe the development of myeloneuropathy and blood dyscrasias. Neurological symptoms may include sensory disturbance, limb weakness and difficulty walking. These reports are very rare, given that several million people are users of the products.

It is important to note that zinc is not absorbed through the mouth, remaining bound to the adhesive and is only absorbed when swallowed. A small amount of adhesive is swallowed during normal use. This is not considered to be harmful.

Patients who have used Super Poligrip 'Original', Super Poligrip 'Ultra Fresh', and Super Poligrip 'Extra Care' in accordance with the instructions may continue to do so safely. While the majority of patients do use these products safely, some patients apply more adhesive than directed and use it more than once per day, usually due to ill-fitting dentures. These patients have been advised to consult their dentist for advice.

We have instructed denture wearers who have used GSK zinc-containing denture adhesives Super Poligrip 'Original', Super Poligrip 'Ultra Fresh', and Super Poligrip 'Extra Care' in excess of the product directions for several years or are concerned about their health to discontinue use, consult with their Doctor and use a zinc free alternative (e.g., Super Poligrip 'Free', Super Poligrip 'Comfort Seal Strips', Super Poligrip 'Powder'). A typical 2.4oz (68g) tube should last 8-10 weeks.

If you have any patients who describe neurological symptoms associated with long-term excessive denture adhesive use, you should refer your patient to their Doctor for assessment. We also ask that you report the case to us toll free (866)640-1017.

Regards,

Dr. Howard Marsh

Chief Medical Officer

GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare

# Hedera P, et al. (2009) Myelopolyneuropathy, and pancytopenia due to copper deficiency and high zinc levels of unknown origin II. The denture cream is a primary source of excessive zinc. Neurotoxicology 30: 996-999.

Nations SP, et al. (2008) Denture Cream: an unusual source of excess zinc, leading to hypocupremia and neurologic disease. Neurology 71:639-643.


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